mirnah:

Supermodel Freja Beha Erichsen stars in Nomade story captured by fashion photographer Glen Luchford for the April 2014 edition of Vogue Paris. 


Tuesday on NBC CT Today!



thecoveteur:

Hashtag tea time. @morganshotels #LFW (at St. Martin’s Lane Hotel)

thecoveteur:

Hashtag tea time. @morganshotels #LFW (at St. Martin’s Lane Hotel)


condenasttraveler:

Uzès, a quiet and charming little town in France. Read why we love it in our March 2014 issue. Photograph by @brianwferry  #tasteintravel #takemethere #nextup #uzèz #france  (at Uzès)

condenasttraveler:

Uzès, a quiet and charming little town in France. Read why we love it in our March 2014 issue. Photograph by @brianwferry #tasteintravel #takemethere #nextup #uzèz #france (at Uzès)





sarahfit:

27 hours in New York CityLast week, I headed down to NYC for what was supposed to be a Thursday shoot. Yes, New England was…View Post

sarahfit:

27 hours in New York City

Last week, I headed down to NYC for what was supposed to be a Thursday shoot. Yes, New England was…

View Post


thenearsightedmonkey:

HOW HANDWRITING BOOSTS THE BRAIN
SOURCE: The Wall Street Journal

Other research highlights the hand’s unique relationship with the brain when it comes to composing thoughts and ideas. Virginia Berninger, a professor of educational psychology at the University of Washington, says handwriting differs from typing because it requires executing sequential strokes to form a letter, whereas keyboarding involves selecting a whole letter by touching a key.
She says pictures of the brain have illustrated that sequential finger movements activated massive regions involved in thinking, language and working memory—the system for temporarily storing and managing information.
And one recent study of hers demonstrated that in grades two, four and six, children wrote more words, faster, and expressed more ideas when writing essays by hand versus with a keyboard.
Continue reading….

thenearsightedmonkey:

HOW HANDWRITING BOOSTS THE BRAIN

SOURCE: The Wall Street Journal

Other research highlights the hand’s unique relationship with the brain when it comes to composing thoughts and ideas. Virginia Berninger, a professor of educational psychology at the University of Washington, says handwriting differs from typing because it requires executing sequential strokes to form a letter, whereas keyboarding involves selecting a whole letter by touching a key.

She says pictures of the brain have illustrated that sequential finger movements activated massive regions involved in thinking, language and working memory—the system for temporarily storing and managing information.

And one recent study of hers demonstrated that in grades two, four and six, children wrote more words, faster, and expressed more ideas when writing essays by hand versus with a keyboard.

Continue reading….

(via thenearsightedmonkey)